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Lead Poisoning is Not Just a Drinking Water Issue

CHARTS: The State of Lead Poisoning in the U.S.

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Tim Kelly

Timothy “TK” Kelly

TK’s Take – Lead-poisoned drinking water

The situation in Flint Michigan is a nightmarish scenario. It is made worse by the fact that it may have been covered-up or, at least by individuals who failed to act. Not helping matters are the actions of people like Hillary Clinton politicizing the issue and trying to benefit personally. None of this is acceptable.

But as the article below will indicate, there may be other cities like Flint and there may also be additional lead hazards other than water. Parents and citizen concerned about the safety of their water supply and/or possible sources of environmental hazards can perform their own test using qualified, professional testing labs.

Posted on February 10, 2016 by Natalie Morin – The dangerous amount of lead recently found in the water supply of Flint, Mich. came as a shock to the majority of the American people. Believe it or not, many other states are familiar with the problem of elevated lead levels in children.

Using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), HealthGrove found 21 states with the percentages of children younger than 72 months that tested positive for elevated blood lead levels. Elevated blood lead levels is defined as equal to or greater than 10 ug/dL lead in blood for children younger than 72 months old. These blood lead levels are detected through blood lead tests conducted in labs. HealthGrove only included states that reported 2014 statistics, as data reporting is not mandatory for all states, and the list is in no particular order as coverage in each state is sparse.

HealthGrove also noted the number of toxic chemicals in each state as of 2013, which is data gathered by the Health Indicators Warehouse. This is defined as the quantity of toxic chemicals (defined as Toxic Release Inventory chemicals) that are disposed of, released to the environment, or managed (for example, treated or recycled) by regulated facilities. TRI is a database that contains detailed information on nearly 650 chemicals and chemical categories that over 23,000 industrial and other facilities manage through disposal or other releases, recycling, energy recovery, or treatment. Data is collected from regulated facilities in industries including manufacturing, metal and coal mining, electric utilities, commercial hazardous waste treatment, and other industrial sectors. HealthGrove also calculated the pounds of toxic chemicals released and disposed of per capita.

These elevated lead levels aren’t simply the product of contaminated water. In fact, many cases of lead poisoning stem from lead-based paint. Also, even lower levels of lead (like 2 ug/dL) can be associated with mental impairment. Fortunately, there have been many state regulations in the past few decades to reduce exposure to lead.

Note: Louisiana was not included in this list due to lack of reporting in many of its counties, but those counties that have reported their data have seen abnormally high rates of lead poisoning in small children.

#21. Tennessee

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.14%

Toxic chemicals: 78,013,698 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 12.18
Population: 6,402,387

#20. Arizona

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.14%

Toxic chemicals: 70,121,662 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 10.82
Population: 6,479,703

#19. Georgia

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.15%

Toxic chemicals: 71,399,684 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 7.28
Population: 9,810,417

#18. Mississippi

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.23%

Toxic chemicals: 67,182,036 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 22.57
Population: 2,976,872

#17. Minnesota

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.25%

Toxic chemicals: 26,355,994 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 4.93
Population: 5,347,740

#16. Maryland

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.3%

Toxic chemicals: 8,277,916 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 1.42
Population: 5,834,299

#15. Kentucky

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.37%

Toxic chemicals: 72,093,781 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 16.53
Population: 4,361,333

#14. Massachusetts

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.37%

Toxic chemicals: 3,586,455 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 0.54
Population: 6,605,058

#13. Michigan

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.46%

Toxic chemicals: 69,618,166 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 7.04
Population: 9,886,095

#12. Oklahoma

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.5%

Toxic chemicals: 30,227,185 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 7.98
Population: 3,785,742

#11. Alabama

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.51%

Toxic chemicals: 87,083,995 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 18.14
Population: 4,799,277

#10. Indiana

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.54%

Toxic chemicals: 153,044,979 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 23.49
Population: 6,514,861

#9. Vermont

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.57%

Toxic chemicals: 271,178 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 0.43
Population: 625,904

#8. New Hampshire

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.67%

Toxic chemicals: 726,528 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 0.55
Population: 1,319,171

#7. West Virginia

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.69%

Toxic chemicals: 37,999,716 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 20.5
Population: 1,853,619

#6. Connecticut

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.69%

Toxic chemicals: 2,099,282 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 0.58
Population: 3,583,561

#5. Wisconsin

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.77%

Toxic chemicals: 35,696,862 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 6.25
Population: 5,706,871

#4. Rhode Island

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.81%

Toxic chemicals: 302,326 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 0.29
Population: 1,051,695

#3. Ohio

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 0.96%

Toxic chemicals: 130,988,494 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 11.34
Population: 11,549,590

#2. Pennsylvania

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 1.28%

Toxic chemicals: 97,111,482 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 7.63
Population: 12,731,381

#1. New York

Percent of children with elevated lead levels: 1.46%

Toxic chemicals: 16,783,980 lbs
Pounds of chemicals per capita: 0.86
Population: 19,487,053

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Timothy Kelly
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Timothy Kelly

Tim Kelly is the Founder of ForexTV. Since its inception in 2003, ForexTV has been a global leader in forex news and has expanded its news coverage to multiple industries. ForexTV is now one of the most recognized brands in global financial news. Mr. Kelly was also the creator and co-founder of 401kTV where he served as Managing Editor until April 2017.

Mr. Kelly is an expert in online marketing, search engine optimization, content development and content distribution. He has consulted some of the top brokerages, media companies and financial exchanges on online marketing and content management including: The New York Board of Trade, Chicago Board Options Exchange, International Business Times, Briefing.com, Bloomberg and Bridge Information Systems and 401kTV.

He continues to be a regular market analyst and writer for ForexTV.com. He holds a Series 3 and Series 34 CFTC registration and formerly was a Commodities Trading Advisor (CTA). Tim is also an expert and specialist in Ichimoku technical analysis. He was also a licensed Property & Casualty; Life, Accident & Health Insurance Producer in New York State.

In addition to writing about the financial markets, Mr. Kelly writes extensively about online marketing and content marketing.

Mr. Kelly attended Boston College where he studied English Literature and Economics, and also attended the University of Siena, Italy where he studied studio art.

Mr. Kelly has been a decades-long community volunteer in his hometown of Long Island where he established the community assistance foundation, Kelly's Heroes. He has also been a coach of Youth Lacrosse for over 10 years. Prior to volunteering in youth sports, Mr. Kelly was involved in the Inner City Scholarship program administered by the Archdiocese of New York.

Before creating ForexTV, Mr, Kelly was Sr. VP Global Marketing for Bridge Information Systems, the world’s second largest financial market data vendor. Prior to Bridge, Mr. Kelly was a team leader of Media at Bloomberg Financial Markets, where he created Bloomberg Personal Magazine with an initial circulation of over 7 million copies monthly.
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