Home / Top News / The Momentary Becomes First Building to Use Bendheim’s Glass Rainscreen as Multi-Story Projection Screen

The Momentary Becomes First Building to Use Bendheim’s Glass Rainscreen as Multi-Story Projection Screen

Eighty-Foot-Tall Projectable Glass Facade Brings Contemporary Art to the Outdoors

he Momentary by Wheeler Kearns Architects. Vertical performance by BANDALOOP on top of the Bendheim glass rainscreen. Photo courtesy BANDALOOP.

he Momentary by Wheeler Kearns Architects. Vertical performance by BANDALOOP on top of the Bendheim glass rainscreen. Photo courtesy BANDALOOP.

The Momentary by Wheeler Kearns Architects. Photo by Tom Harris Architectural Photography.

The Momentary by Wheeler Kearns Architects. Photo by Tom Harris Architectural Photography.

NEW YORK, NY, Aug. 04, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Momentary, located in Bentonville, AR, is the world’s first building to use Bendheim’s innovative glass rainscreen system as a 6,000 sq. ft. projection surface. The custom-imprinted glass screen features the company’s new LumiFrit surface #1 fritted glass, which is optimal for reflecting light and can be customized in a virtually unlimited range of decorative patterns.

The Momentary, a former Kraft Foods cheese factory, is a new adaptive-reuse project by Wheeler Kearns Architects of Chicago, IL. The complex is a contemporary satellite to the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, AR. Among its chief new architectural features is an 80-foot tall projectable glass rainscreen by Bendheim, used as a scrim around a new concrete stair and elevator tower.

Bendheim’s LumiFrit glass cladding lends the tower a brilliant white, ephemeral aesthetic during the day. At night, the white frit pattern, uniquely applied to the outermost surface of the glass, bounces front-projected light to create a sharp image.

The glass rainscreen was tested as a projection surface – and stage – by BANDALOOP, the pioneer in vertical modern dance. The group choreographed and staged a performance on top of the glass, designed to “activate the public space.” A facade that doubles as a digital art canvas is remarkably relevant today, as outdoor venues are becoming a necessity by promoting culture in a safer and healthier environment.

“This cutting-edge installation heralds a more positive and creative future,” said Robert Jayson, President of Bendheim. “We are proud to have been selected for the project, and are pleased to see Bendheim glass used in such an unusual and captivating way.” 

Bendheim’s rainscreen incorporates four unique fritted glass designs, ranging from 50% to 80% opaque. They were designed by Osage graphic artist Addie Roanhorse and were inspired by traditional Osage Native American design motifs.

On the back of the glass, Bendheim’s SatinTech® etched finish acts as a dispersion filter for LED back-lighting. It turns the glass facade into a beacon of light that can be used creatively to highlight special events. A recent blood drive, spearheaded by the Momentary and Community Blood Center of the Ozarks, “painted” the glass tower in a bright red light.  

The architects chose Bendheim’s rainscreen system for its distinctive glass makeup and ease of use. The system fastens directly to the concrete to eliminate the need for a costly steel substructure and the shadow lines associated with it. Patented clip attachments allow each glass panel to be installed and replaced independently of its neighbors, speeding installation and facilitating maintenance. “This unique quality pushed the owner and us in that direction,” said Calli Verkamp, Project Architect at Wheeler Kearns Architects. The glass was installed by Advantage Glass of Tulsa, OK.

For more information on Bendheim’s glass rainscreen systems, please visit https://bendheim.com/system/flat-glass-rainscreen-systems/.

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CONTACT: Thomas Renner
Catalyst Marketing Communications
203-348-7541
[email protected]

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